The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (2022)

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (1)Telemedicine use has rapidly increased due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has kept patients away from doctors’ offices. But even before this outbreak, telemedicine filled a need for many patients, including those who were geographically isolated, too sick to travel, or without transportation. There are countless other reasons that make traveling to the doctor difficult, or even impossible. With telemedicine, your appointment is “virtual”, taking place over a phone or computer. But before you have a virtual appointment, it’s important to consider the pros and cons of telemedicine.

What exactly is telemedicine?

Telehealth is the broad term for all healthcare services that use telecommunications, including telephone alerts regarding disease outbreaks. Telemedicine, a subset of telehealth, is the use of telecommunications to provide clinical services to patients. (Although it’s worth noting that these terms are often used interchangeably.)

For telemedicine appointments, doctors and other healthcare professionals conduct virtual appointments with patients via phone or video (e.g., Skype or FaceTime) or telephone. Additionally, some systems allow patients to send photos to their doctors using integrated software, allowing doctors to see areas of concern more clearly, such as moles, burns or bruises.

Telehealth may include the use of at home monitoring systems that make it easy for doctors to track a patient’s important health parameters, such as heart rate and blood pressure. And some telemedicine tools include the use of chatbots and automated algorithms.

To clarify, there are two main avenues for telemedicine services. Large companies, like Teladoc and Amwell (aka American Well), are primarily telemedicine companies. Their doctors never see patients in person. When patients “visit” a doctor from a telemedicine company, they are speaking with doctors they do not know.

On the other hand, doctors and even urgent care centers increasingly offer virtual appointments with their own patients.

The use of telemedicine is rapidly growing as more doctors and patients participate, especially with the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are pros and cons of telemedicine – read on to learn more.

The pros and cons of telemedicine.

When weighing the pros and cons of telemedicine, realize that no doctor, or service is perfect. Errors are possible in all methods of healthcare delivery.

Telemedicine has many benefits.

Telemedicine limits exposure to dangerous germs.

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (2)Clearly, telemedicine protects both patients and doctors from dangerous germs. As the world fights COVID-19, healthcare workers are at great risk of contracting the potentially deadly virus as they care for infected patients. Conversely, patients without COVID-19 could pick up the infection from someone they encounter at a medical appointment.

Clearly, it’s best for everyone, including the greater community, if patients who suspect they might be infected stay home. But this isn’t only true for COVID-19. Keeping sick patients at home, when their conditions allow, helps reduce the spread of any type of germ. Certainly, a benefit of telemedicine is that it can help patients get medical care without leaving their homes.

Improved access to doctors, including specialists.

Plain and simple – telemedicine improves access to doctors. Since there are widespread shortages of doctors and other healthcare providers, in both rural and urban areas, telemedicine provides access to services and doctors that would otherwise be nearly impossible.

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Similarly, patients with rare diseases can connect with hard-to-find specialists who are too far to see in person. For instance, many patients don’t have access to a geneticist to diagnose rare genetic disorders, and telemedicine can bridge that gap.

For more information,read my blog post Can Telemedicine Help You Get a Proper Diagnosis for a Rare Disease?

It’s so convenient!

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (3)Why would you want to travel to your doctor’s office and wait in the waiting room for 20-30 minutes when you could wait for your telemedicine appointment while at home or at work?

Interestingly,one study found the average in-office medical visit takes 121 minutes – 20 minutes seeing the doctor and 101 minutes traveling to/from the doctor and sitting in the waiting room. Clearly, virtual visits save you time and eliminate travel-related stresses and expenses. And all that driving and waiting usually means more time away from work, family, and other obligations.

And of course, telemedicine is a great tool if you cannot get to the doctor due to illness, transportation issues or other impediments.

It can minimize unneeded visits to the doctor or ER.

It can be a waste of time and money to go to a doctor or the ER if your health doesn’t require an in-person visit. With telemedicine, you can speak with a doctor from the comfort of your home or job. Together you can decide if you should follow up with a visit to the doctor or go to the ER.

Reduced healthcare costs.

Telemedicine can reduce or contain healthcare spending by increasing efficiency via better management of chronic diseases, reduced travel times, and fewer or shorter hospital stays. Since so many of us have high deductible insurance plans, as well as responsibility for a portion of each bill, lowering healthcare costs helps us all.

There is a potential of improved quality of healthcare.

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (4)Telemedicine has the potential to improve the quality of care by making it easier to for providers to stay engaged with patients. Additionally, when doctors remotely track a patient’s health via monitoring systems, they can identify problems as soon as they develop.

Studies show that the quality of telemedicine services delivered are as good those provided through in-person appointments. Interestingly, according to the American Telemedicine Association, “in some specialties, particularly in mental health…telemedicine delivers a superior product, with greater outcomes and patient satisfaction.”

However, on a personal note, I know of a patient whose potentially fatal condition “slipped through the cracks” due to telemedicine. This patient had several telemedicine appointments, but the lack of in-person care made it hard for the doctor to realize just how sick she was.

The cons of telemedicine.

You can’t get physical!

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (5)Firstly, it goes without saying that physical exams are impossible via phone of computer. And of course, there are circumstances when an in-person visit is essential for diagnosis and treatment. For instance, doctors on the phone or computer can’t feel for swollen glands or look at throats or noses to test for COVID-19, strep throat or other infections.

Additionally, doctors can’t screen for blood pressure or cholesterol levels over the phone. In fact, the decrease in the number of in-person doctor visits due to COVID-19 led to a significant decrease in cardiovascular screenings, both important for the prevention of heart attacks and strokes.

Researchers compared primary care visits in the 2nd quarter of 2020 with the 2nd quarters of 2018 and 2019. They found:

  • Blood pressure checks dropped by 50.1%
  • Cholesterol tests fell by 36.9%
  • New medication visits decreased by 26.0%

However, for patient follow-ups and minor conditions, a virtual visit may be enough. And if the patient is too ill to leave their house or can’t leave due to the risk of exposing others to a potentially dangerous germ, a virtual appointment can be a good starting point.

(Video) Telemedicine: 5 Pros & Cons when You have Chronic Medical Issues. Life with a Vent

And if a patient cannot travel far distances for an in-person appointment, a virtual appointment is far better than no appointment at all.

Technical glitches and obstacles.

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (6)Certainly, it’s frustrating when the image of friends or family freeze on the screen, or when audio cuts out, when chatting on video calls. But it’s more than annoying when glitches occur during a telemedicine appointment. A really bad connection can force you to cut the appointment short or reschedule altogether.

Additionally, connecting to a telemedicine appointment can be frustrating and time consuming. Sometimes you can simply click on a link you receive via email or text, but other times you have to download a computer application and then click through multiple steps to log in.

Not everyone can use video for appointments.

Unfortunately, it can be difficult, if not impossible, for lower income people to take advantage of video calling for telemedicine appointments. In fact, a2020 study of telemedicine appointments among lower income patients found that most of the telemedicine appointments were conducted over the phone.

Could this impact the quality of care? Probably. Experts express concerns about the quality of audio-only appointments, as compared to video appointments.

You might not know the doctor on the other side of the phone.

As mentioned, the doctor you speak with during a virtual appointment may be a stranger to you since some doctors use outside telemedicine companies to provide virtual care for their patients. Additionally, many employers now provide telemedicine services from 3rd party vendors as part of their benefit offerings.

In these circumstances, you’ll connect with doctors who are unfamiliar with you and your medical history, which can impact the care you receive. Additionally, a new doctor will not have had any chance to earn your trust, yet trusting the opinion of your doctors is an important part of healthcare. Simply put, will you fully trust the advice of a doctor you never met?

Distractions can lower the quality of the appointment.

When patients meet with doctors in person, it’s easy to stay focused on the conversation. However, when patients have telehealth appointments, the opportunities for distraction are endless. And these distractions can lead to less engagement, which can negatively impact your health and care.

How distracted are we? According to a 2020 survey conducted by DrFirst, many patients are distracted during telemedicine appointments. Interestingly, 73% of male respondents and 39% of female respondents reported multitasking during telehealth visits. Distractions include:

  • Surfing web, checking email, texting – 24.5%
  • Watching the news, TV, or movie – 24%
  • Scrolling through social media – 21%
  • Playing a video game – 19%
  • Exercising – 18%
  • Driving a car – 10%
  • Having an alcoholic beverage – 9.4%

State laws can narrow access to out-of-state doctors.

Each state makes their own laws regarding telemedicine appointments with doctors licensed in other states. When COVID-19 made in-person visits dangerous for patients and doctors, many states relaxed their rules, allowing broad patient access to out-of-state doctors.

However, some states are reverting back to their old rules and not allowing their residents to have telemedicine appointments with doctors licensed in other states. Importantly, if an out-of-state doctor is also licensed in your state, a telemedicine appointment should not be a problem.

Pediatric patients might get unneeded antibiotics.

Researchers examined treatment recommendationsThe Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (7) from over 500,000 cases of children with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Their analysis found that children with ARI who were treated through telemedicine were significantly more likely to receive antibiotics.

The percent of children with ARI who received antibiotics was as follows:

(Video) Pros and Cons of Telemedicine - Is it Right for Me?

  • 52% of those who used telemedicine services.
  • 42% of patients who went to urgent care.
  • 31% of those who saw their primary care providers.

Additionally, a higher proportion of the antibiotics prescriptions written through telemedicine appointments disregarded medical guidelines regarding when to prescribe antibiotics. This was primarily due to doctors prescribing bacteria-fighting antibiotics to treat viral illnesses (e.g. colds and flus) which cannot be cured with antibiotics.

Why is this important? Prescribing unneeded antibiotics increases the chances of side effects and contributes to the increase of antibiotic-resistant germs. And that is nothing to sneeze at! Experts speculate that antibiotic-resistant germs may kill more people than cancer in the coming decades.

Clearly, this may be one place where the cons of telemedicine outweigh the pros. For more information, read this blog post on the dangers of too many antibiotics.

Interestingly, there is no evidence that adult patients receive a higher number of unneeded antibiotics from telemedicine appointments, as compared to urgent care or primary care doctor visits.

Does this mean that all patients who use telemedicine might get unneeded medications? I don’t know, but it’s worth keeping this study in mind if/when you use telemedicine services.

Chatbots and automated algorithms are far from perfect.

Some telemedicine tools include chatbots and automated algorithms. Importantly, there’s no way for patients to know about the accuracy of these chatbots.

Since many people have turned to chatbots to see if their symptoms could be from COVID-19, STAT reporters put several chatbot symptom checkers to the test. They entered the same symptoms into more than 6 symptom checkers, with the goal of assessing the consistency and clarity of their advice.

Unfortunately, information they received related to their level of COVID-19 risk varied widely. For instance, the chatbot on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website determined he had “one or more symptom(s) that may be related to COVID-19” and suggested he contact a healthcare provider within 24 hours “and start home isolation immediately.”

Conversely, another symptom checker chatbot reported his risk of COVID-19 infection was currently low. Others reported he was at “medium risk” or “might have the infection.”

Until the accuracy of these chatbots is proven, I suggest you don’t rely on them for medical information. Of course, this concern doesn’t apply to the accuracy of advice you receive when speaking with doctors.

Data security concerns.

Cybersecurity is a notable concern in telemedicine. Unfortunately, cybercriminals can hack into telemedicine systems to steal personal and private healthcare information. Not only is this worrisome, but it’s also a violation of HIPAA laws. Sadly, there are currently no existing solutions to stop these criminals, but many experts across the world are hard at work trying to thwart these attacks.

The financial pros and cons of telemedicine.

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (8)Just like any other medical appointment, telemedicine visits come with a fee.

If you use a telemedicine company provided through your employer, there may be little or no cost for you. Or, it might be billed like any other medical appointment, with the same copays and deductibles. To avoid unexpected bills, ask your employer about cost and possible copays before you make an appointment.

If you schedule a virtual appointment through your doctor, your insurance will likely cover it. But don’t assume these visits are covered – and don’t assume your co-pay will be the same as for in-person visits.

(Video) Pros and Cons of Telehealth

Additionally, some doctors charge a convenience fee, which can range from $35 – $125, on top of the normal visit fee. These fees are not covered by insurance, so ask about fees before your virtual appointment!

Most states have telemedicine laws requiring coverage, but state policies change frequently.To learn about coverage in your state, visit the Center for Connected Health Policy website. It’s also a good idea to call your insurance company and ask them about coverage, including co-pays, for telemedicine services.

Medicare and telemedicine.

The Pros and Cons of Telemedicine | What You Need to Know | ZaggoCare (9)In 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) updated their rules to cover some telehealth services for patients in rural areas. However, due to COVID-19, CMS is now covering telehealth services by doctors and other healthcare providers to treat patients with COVID-19 and for other “medically reasonable purposes”.

The new rules, effective March 6, 2020, cover virtual visits from offices, hospitals and places of residence. Note that coinsurance and deductibles apply. It’s unclear if these updated rules will be permanent – time will tell.

What do patients think are the pros and cons of telemedicine?

Certainly, patients realize there are pros and cons of telemedicine. But, it seems like most patients are willing to give it a try. Over the past 15 years, many studies report patient satisfaction and support for telemedical services.

A 2015 patient surveyby Software Advice found that:

  • Among patients who have not used a telemedicine service, 75% express interest in using one in place of an in-person medical visit.
  • Only 16% of patients would prefer care in an ER for a minor ailment, even if they also had access to telemedical services.
  • 2% of telemedicine users say security is their main concern with the telemedical system used.
  • 21% of patients who had virtual appointments say the quality of care was similar to or higher than an in-person visit.

And similar results were found in a2017 survey by Amwell (a telemedicine company). Their survey showed that 2/3 of people expressed a willingness to see a doctor via video.

How many patients use telemedicine?

Telemedicine is gaining traction quickly, particularly with the COVID-19 pandemic.

But even before the COVID-19 outbreak, the number of patients using telehealth services in the US grew 53% between 2016 to 2017. To put this increase in perspective, by comparison, this increase was far greater than the increase in use of urgent care centers (+14%) and retail clinics (+7%). Interestingly, and likely related, the use of Emergency Rooms decreased 2% during that period.

Get the most of every virtual appointment.

Even though your appointment is via the phone or computer, don’t just sit back in your favorite TV chair and relax. You need to prepare for these appointments the same way you would prepare for any in-person medical appointment. For instance, write down your questions prior to your appointment. And have a list of medications taken, along with a record of your symptoms and side effects.

Additionally, as with any appointment,make sure your doctor understands your concerns, listens to your story, and answers your questions. Finally, make sure you understand next steps.

For more information on getting the most out of every appointment, read these blog posts:

  • 10 Tips to Communicate Better with Doctors
  • 10 Tips for a Better Medical Appointment
  • Why Take Detailed Notes at Doctor Appointments?
  • 10 Steps to Reduce Your Risk of Diagnostic Error
  • Should you Speak Up if You Think Your Doctor is Wrong? YES!
  • Learn a Lesson From Serena Williams: Trust Your Instincts When it Comes to Your Health

My final thoughts…

There are many pros and cons related to telemedicine, so consider your needs before scheduling a telemedicine appointment. My recent telemedicine appointments were successful, and I hope to continue with telemedicine appointments even after COVID-19 is no longer a threat. But I know there will also be times I want to see my doctors in-person.

NOTE: I updated this post on 8-6-21.

(Video) Telemedicine in 2021: pros and cons

FAQs

What are the pros and cons of telemedicine? ›

Top pros and cons of telehealth
  • Pro: Telehealth minimizes the spread of infectious diseases.
  • Con: It's impossible to conduct a physical exam virtually.
  • Pro: Telehealth is convenient.
  • Con: Regulations can be confusing.
  • Pro: Telehealth can reduce unnecessary ER visits.
12 Jan 2021

What are 10 advantages of using telemedicine? ›

Benefits
  • Easy access to specialists. ...
  • Lower cost. ...
  • Medical access for people without health insurance. ...
  • Medical access for people in rural areas. ...
  • Medical access for people in underserved urban areas. ...
  • Reduced exposure to pathogens. ...
  • Middle-of-the-night care for babies and children. ...
  • No need for childcare.

What are 3 benefits of telemedicine? ›

Definitive Guide to Telemedicine
  • No transportation time or costs. ...
  • No need to take time off of work. ...
  • Eliminate child or elder care issues. ...
  • On-demand options. ...
  • Access to Specialists. ...
  • Less Chance of Catching a New Illness. ...
  • Less Time in the Waiting Room. ...
  • Better Health.

What are some disadvantages of telehealth? ›

Downsides to telehealth

It isn't possible to do every type of visit remotely. You still have to go into the office for things like imaging tests and blood work, as well as for diagnoses that require a more hands-on approach. The security of personal health data transmitted electronically is a concern.

What are the pros of telemedicine? ›

Telemedicine, or virtual health visits, offers patients an additional option to consult with their physicians.
  • Control of Infectious Illness. ...
  • Better Assessment. ...
  • Family Connections. ...
  • Primary Care and Chronic Condition Management.

Why is telemedicine so important? ›

Telehealth helps increase health care value and affordability. Virtual care technology saves patients time and money, reduces patient transfers, emergency department and urgent care center visits, and delivers savings to payers.

What is telemedicine short answer? ›

Telemedicine is the exchange of medical information from one location to another using electronic communication, which improves patient health status.

What problems do telemedicine solve? ›

Telemedicine could especially solve the problems created by the lack of medicare coverage in rural areas by providing medical services remotely i.e. for the patient at home. This includes the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Most of the diagnoses could be executed by the physician remotely.

What are the three types of telemedicine? ›

The practice of telemedicine largely breaks down into three types of solutions, store-and-forward, remote patient monitoring, and real-time encounters.
  • Store-and-Forward Telemedicine. ...
  • Remote Patient Monitoring. ...
  • Real-time telemedicine.

What are five methods of telemedicine? ›

The Types of Telemedicine
  • Real-time Telemedicine.
  • Real-time telemedicine (also called live telemedicine) makes it easy to do a doctor-patient visit anytime, anywhere. ...
  • Remote Patient Monitoring. ...
  • “Store-and-Forward” Practices. ...
  • Consultation Between Specialists and Primary Caregivers. ...
  • Medical Imaging. ...
  • Telemedicine Networks.

What are the barriers to telemedicine? ›

Rollback of COVID-19 waivers, coverage and payment policies (77 percent) Lack of insurer coverage of telehealth services (76 percent) Low or no reimbursement (64 percent) Technology challenges for my patient population (54 percent)

How does telemedicine affect the quality of care? ›

Telehealth gives patients better access to health care by improving convenience and continuity. It also makes specialty care more widely available and removes barriers to access.

What are the biggest challenges for telemedicine programs? ›

Inadequate telemedicine parity laws, Medicare reimbursement and lack of EHR integration are among the top challenges faced by telehealth programs, reveals a new survey from Reach Health.

What are the challenges of telehealth telemedicine? ›

There are “seven deadly barriers” for telemedicine: money, regulations, hype, adoption, technology, evidence, and success. Some of these are shared with health care in general and some are new kinds of barriers that accompany the transformation of health care by telemedicine.

Is telemedicine safe and secure? ›

Telehealth is a safe and secure way of connecting with your health care provider online. Just like in-person care, your telehealth appointments, messages, and information are protected by privacy rules.

Why is telemedicine the future? ›

The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 14.9% over the forecast period 2019 to 2026 as more hospitals and healthcare facilities bring this technology online. Telehealth has the potential to reduce healthcare costs, improve patient outreach and health outcomes, and change the way providers treat their patients.

Does telemedicine actually work? ›

Telemedicine can do many things. But it can't replace all doctor visits. If you have a long-term illness, you can use it to share home readings like blood pressure or blood sugar levels and to talk to your doctor about them.

What is telemedicine and give examples? ›

Telemedicine refers to the use of information technologies and electronic communications to provide remote clinical services to patients. The digital transmission of medical imaging, remote medical diagnosis and evaluations, and video consultations with specialists are all examples of telemedicine.

What are the main types of telemedicine? ›

There are three main types of telemedicine, which include store-and-forward, remote monitoring, and real-time interactive services. Each of these has a beneficial role to play in overall health care and, when utilized properly, can offer tangible benefits for both healthcare workers and patients.

How does telemedicine work? ›

What does telehealth mean? Telehealth — sometimes called telemedicine — lets your health care provider provide care for you without an in-person office visit. Telehealth is done primarily online with internet access on your computer, tablet, or smartphone.

Does telemedicine improve health outcomes? ›

Telehealth is beneficial for specific uses and patient populations. There is a large volume of research reporting that clinical outcomes with telehealth are as good as or better than usual care and that telehealth improves intermediate outcomes and satisfaction.

How does telemedicine improve efficiency? ›

Telemedicine can also improve operations by reducing no-shows, which create scheduling problems and lost revenue. At the same time, the technology can boost revenues by allowing practices to take on new patients who can't get quick access to their doctors or just like the convenience of video appointments.

Is telemedicine the future of healthcare? ›

We can safely say that telemedicine is the future of healthcare for years to come. During the past two years, we witnessed it being one of the greatest solutions to access to care issues during this global pandemic by reducing the spread of the virus through decreased person to person interactions.

What are the 4 types of telehealth? ›

Today, telehealth encompasses four distinct applications. These are commonly known as live video, store-and-forward, remote patient monitoring, and mobile health. Explore each modality in detail to learn more. Live, two-way interaction between a person and a provider using audiovisual telecommunications technology.

What are the 4 telehealth technologies? ›

The Four Types of Telehealth
  • Live Video-Conferencing. ...
  • Asynchronous Video (AKA Store-and-Forward) ...
  • Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) ...
  • Mobile Health (mHealth)
15 Aug 2018

What technologies are used in telemedicine? ›

Live video conferencing, mobile health apps, “store and forward” electronic transmission, and remote patient monitoring (RPM) are examples of technologies used in telehealth.

How many types of telemedicine are there? ›

While there are various types of telemedicine, the three major types include; store and forward telemedicine, remote monitoring, and real-time interactive services.

What are the privacy concerns about telemedicine? ›

What Cybersecurity Concerns are Associated with Telemedicine?
  • Patients are not in control of their own data. ...
  • Video conferencing apps are not necessarily HIPAA compliant. ...
  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) ...
  • Working from home presents security risks.
12 Nov 2020

Can telemedicine be hacked? ›

Between firewalls, passwords, encryption, and private servers, the chances of hacking telemedicine services are pretty unlikely. Telemedicine services are relatively safe. There is some controversy surrounding medical information and privacy versus confidentiality, but most information is already out there.

How can we improve telemedicine? ›

  1. Announcing the availability of telehealth.
  2. Introducing patients to telehealth.
  3. Obtaining informed consent.
  4. Helping patients prepare for their telehealth appointment.
  5. Conduct a telehealth physical exam.
  6. Creating an emergency plan.
  7. Telehealth and remote patient monitoring.
27 Jul 2022

Does telemedicine improve patient care? ›

Telemedicine has improved patient outcomes through advanced monitoring, cognitive affordances, clinical decision-support functions, execution of life saving, and evidence-based critical care protocols.

Does telemedicine reduce cost? ›

Savings through substitutions

A 2017 study found that telehealth visits cost patients an average of $79, compared to $146 for an office visit. That is in addition to savings associated with time and travel costs, estimated to total $89 billion a year in lost time.

What are pros and cons? ›

Definition of pros and cons

1 : arguments for and against —often + of Congress weighed the pros and cons of the new tax plan. 2 : good points and bad points Each technology has its pros and cons.

What are 10 Advantages and disadvantages of internet? ›

List Of Top 10+ Advantages And Disadvantages Of Internet
Top 10+ Advantages of the InternetTop 10+ Disadvantages of the Internet
Online Services, booking & Schedule & Job ApplyAddiction & Causes Distractions
Video Conferencing & Screen SharingPornographic and violent images
8 more rows
30 Mar 2021

What are the pros and cons of online? ›

The Pros And Cons Of Online Classes
Pros of Online LearningCons of Online Learning
FlexibilityLess Social Interaction
AffordabilityLimited Course Availability
IndividualizationRequires High Degree of Self Discipline
22 Mar 2022

What are the top three challenges of telehealth services? ›

Telehealth services helps to support healthcare, but it has its challenges, including cost, varying regulations, over-promotion, adoption/competition, technology, lack of studies, and success.

What are the barriers to telemedicine? ›

Rollback of COVID-19 waivers, coverage and payment policies (77 percent) Lack of insurer coverage of telehealth services (76 percent) Low or no reimbursement (64 percent) Technology challenges for my patient population (54 percent)

What are the biggest challenges for telemedicine programs? ›

Inadequate telemedicine parity laws, Medicare reimbursement and lack of EHR integration are among the top challenges faced by telehealth programs, reveals a new survey from Reach Health.

What problems do telemedicine solve? ›

Telemedicine could especially solve the problems created by the lack of medicare coverage in rural areas by providing medical services remotely i.e. for the patient at home. This includes the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Most of the diagnoses could be executed by the physician remotely.

What is the effectiveness of telemedicine? ›

A total of 35 studies with moderate strength of evidence found that telehealth improves access in terms of time to service and comprehensiveness of service. These studies showed reduced wait times, reduced time to treatment, and an increase in the number of patients receiving indicated diagnostic tests or treatments.

How does telemedicine affect healthcare? ›

Telehealth gives patients better access to health care by improving convenience and continuity. It also makes specialty care more widely available and removes barriers to access.

What are the three types of telemedicine? ›

The practice of telemedicine largely breaks down into three types of solutions, store-and-forward, remote patient monitoring, and real-time encounters.
  • Store-and-Forward Telemedicine. ...
  • Remote Patient Monitoring. ...
  • Real-time telemedicine.

Is telemedicine safe and secure? ›

Telehealth is a safe and secure way of connecting with your health care provider online. Just like in-person care, your telehealth appointments, messages, and information are protected by privacy rules.

How does telemedicine improve quality of care? ›

Telemedicine connects the convenience, low cost, and ready accessibility of health-related information and communication using the Internet and associated technologies.

What are the five basic requirement for telemedicine? ›

There are five hardware requirements you need to fulfill before you launch your telehealth coverage. These requirements include a secure internet connection, a video platform, proper tech support, video recording capabilities, and telehealth peripherals that will assist you in your virtual patient visits.

What are the top three challenges of telehealth services? ›

Telehealth services helps to support healthcare, but it has its challenges, including cost, varying regulations, over-promotion, adoption/competition, technology, lack of studies, and success.

Is telemedicine the future of healthcare? ›

We can safely say that telemedicine is the future of healthcare for years to come. During the past two years, we witnessed it being one of the greatest solutions to access to care issues during this global pandemic by reducing the spread of the virus through decreased person to person interactions.

Why telemedicine is the future? ›

The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 14.9% over the forecast period 2019 to 2026 as more hospitals and healthcare facilities bring this technology online. Telehealth has the potential to reduce healthcare costs, improve patient outreach and health outcomes, and change the way providers treat their patients.

Is telemedicine better than in person? ›

Similar Efficacy & Satisfaction. Many studies have shown that satisfaction rates of both patients and physicians were the same, if not greater when compared to in-person visits. For the majority, telehealth is generally well accepted by patients, parents, and clinicians.

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